Toothpaste

I like to think I’m a fairly responsible person. I’m a firstborn, and we are the responsible folks of the world. (OK, so much for the stereotype.) When I see something that needs to be done, I do it. Or I procrastinate! Do you identify? I recently did a deep clean of my bathroom and found not one, but FOUR tubes of toothpaste with a little product left in each one. I think I’ve maybe had two before, but FOUR! When I’m getting ready to go somewhere or to bed at night, I just want to brush my teeth. I don’t want to mess with little bits of toothpaste (that I perceive to take too much of my energy.) There is little counter space in my bathroom, so getting that last little bit out adds a few annoying seconds to my busy lifestyle. This all sounds rather terrible; surely there are bigger fish in life to fry! And certainly, there are MUCH bigger problems in the world to solve! But we all have little things in our lives that bug us until we take care of them. Maybe it’s the flowers that need to be deadheaded so they can bloom again, or that phone call you’ve been meaning to make, or that closet that desperately needs cleaning out. Research shows that simply writing something down—getting it out of your head—can reduce mental and emotional fatigue. Not only do TO-DO lists help you prioritize and plan, but they also help reduce what you are burdened to carry around in your head. Many self-development gurus, like Seth Godin and Rob Bell talk about the importance of saying “yes” to the things we really want and then committing to STEP 1. Saying yes means you commit to...

030: Reinventing Yourself Jul04

030: Reinventing Yourself...

http://media.blubrry.com/gcoyl/p/media.medeor.co/gcoyl/30-Reinventing_Yourself_-_Regina_Hopewell_-_7_4_15__12.04_PM.mp3Podcast: Play in new window | Download (Duration: 13:12 — 12.1MB)Change is an inevitable part of life and how we negotiate change makes all the difference. Transitions in career and relationships as well as life-altering events give us the opportunity to reinvent ourselves. In this conversation, Dr. Regina Hopewell shares her life story and highlights principles she’s learned to make successful transitions. The Center on Just Living site explains Regina and her husband Mark’s work on sustainability and justice issues. They also offer a list of fantastic resources. Resources Regina shared include: Living on Purpose by Tom & Christine Sine Walking Gently on the Earth by By Lisa Graham McMinn and Megan Anna Neff Everyday Justice by Julie...

Are You a Busyologist?...

We are chronically busy. We are often tired. I choose to be active and tend to over-extend myself. But as I get older, I also give myself permission to take breaks from busyness to rest, restore my soul, and be with friends. That is exactly what I’m going to do next week when my college courses are on spring break. My friend and colleague Amy Roemer sent me this short article that is timely for me. I hope it is timely for you also. Just as I turned off the TV the other night I heard someone introduced as a “busyologist.” What? I listened a moment more and realized he was a physiologist. Still, it caught my imagination. So many of us can be described as busyologists. We do things just to stay busy. We over-commit because we’re afraid of having nothing to do (or for whatever reasons). If we happen to find a free moment, we fill it with Facebook or Pinterest or Angry Birds, or simply searching the web for anything we can think of. I think we take pride in telling others how busy we are. We are busyologists. No one seems to care what you do, as long as you’re busy. “Hi! Haven’t seen you in a while. How are you?” “Busy.” “Wow! I’m impressed.” Sounds silly when I put it into print, doesn’t it? Yet it’s so hard to get off the merry-go-round. If I take the time to sit and read for pleasure, I feel like I have to apologize for it. But no, I’m going to say it proudly, “I read a book today, just because I wanted to!” Are you impressed? You know what? It feels good to relax. It energizes you when you slow down...

Shut Up!

Maintaining sanity in a noisy world is more and more challenging. Everybody wants a piece of us, from advertisers to kids to needy friends. It’s ok to have boundaries. In fact, healthy people have lots of healthy boundaries. We are the most over-stimulated people in history. We think we have to be available to everybody all the time. Enough! If you struggle with too much noise in your life, try giving yourself permission to say later or NO! (If you won’t give yourself permission, allow me!) It’s ok to turn off your cell phone and other devices. or wait till later to respond. People die in traffic because they think a text can’t wait. Make wise decisions with your time and resources. While it’s good to be generous with others, their needs do not necessarily set your priorities. Look for ways to quiet your mind. Maybe leaving the TV off (especially early morning and late at night) will give you much needed time alone with your thoughts. Take time each day to be still and think about your priorities. Try relaxing techniques like prayer, meditation or yoga. Take time for yourself. You only give life to others when there is life inside of you.   Photo by Russian photographer, Maria Beliakova, of Jet Media. Retrieved from http://www.freeimages.com/photo/1070268...