Toothpaste

I like to think I’m a fairly responsible person. I’m a firstborn, and we are the responsible folks of the world. (OK, so much for the stereotype.) When I see something that needs to be done, I do it. Or I procrastinate! Do you identify? I recently did a deep clean of my bathroom and found not one, but FOUR tubes of toothpaste with a little product left in each one. I think I’ve maybe had two before, but FOUR! When I’m getting ready to go somewhere or to bed at night, I just want to brush my teeth. I don’t want to mess with little bits of toothpaste (that I perceive to take too much of my energy.) There is little counter space in my bathroom, so getting that last little bit out adds a few annoying seconds to my busy lifestyle. This all sounds rather terrible; surely there are bigger fish in life to fry! And certainly, there are MUCH bigger problems in the world to solve! But we all have little things in our lives that bug us until we take care of them. Maybe it’s the flowers that need to be deadheaded so they can bloom again, or that phone call you’ve been meaning to make, or that closet that desperately needs cleaning out. Research shows that simply writing something down—getting it out of your head—can reduce mental and emotional fatigue. Not only do TO-DO lists help you prioritize and plan, but they also help reduce what you are burdened to carry around in your head. Many self-development gurus, like Seth Godin and Rob Bell talk about the importance of saying “yes” to the things we really want and then committing to STEP 1. Saying yes means you commit to...

resolutions #2

In my last article I opined that setting SMART goals is much more systematic and effective than making resolutions.

rezəˈlo͞oSHəns #1...

The dictionary defines a resolution as a firm decision to do or not to do something. It’s a word that is mostly used this time of year. It’s an abused word.

The Power Of Habit

My whole life I drove manual transmission cars. Shifting was almost as natural as breathing. I hardly had to think about pushing the clutch with my left foot and changing the gears with my right hand. It was a habit…that is, until two years ago, when I bought my first automatic. The funny thing is, I still sometimes reach for the shifter and insist on putting on the emergency brake when I park. Though driving an automatic car is easier, I still find myself occasionally resorting to old habits. Habits are like police characters in TV shows. Just like there are good cops and bad cops, there are good habits and bad habits. Some we want to break; others we want to develop. By understanding how habits work and what triggers them, we can make conscious changes and get control of our life! That’s the theory behind, The Power of Habit: Why We Do What We Do in Life and Business, by New York Times reporter Charles Duhigg. I listened to the book over the holidays, which seemed like a timely addition to my toolkit for the new year. The book is a fascinating study into why we do what we do, with real steps on how to change. The book isn’t a pipedream; Duhigg read hundreds of studies on habit formation from social science, neuroscience and psychology, to come up with his theory. What he offers is both insight and practical. His basic premise is that habits involve 3 key steps: cue, routine and reward. Learning to recognize and manage these 3 steps can empower us to make lasting changes. Check out this short video review that reviews the concept. I encourage you to pick up the book (available in hardcover, paperback, Nook, audio CD, Kindle and downloadable...

Countdown to 2015…5...

Besides enjoying the holidays, you are likely thinking about the coming year. Perhaps you’re even thinking of making some health resolutions! But according to Forbes Magazine, 92% of us fail to realize our resolutions. There seems to be a systematic problem with resolutions. I “wish” I lost weight or was more spiritual are just that, WISHES! Making systematic goals that are SMART are much more helpful. SMART goals are Specific, Measurable, Attainable, Realistic and Timely. For example, you want to be healthier. But how will you DO IT? Specific: I want to lose 10 pounds (4.5 kilos) by March 1st and build body strength. Measurable: My goal is 2 months away, so I need to lose 2.5 pound a month. How? I will mostly illuminate high-sugar carbohydrates like bread and sugars, visit the gym for at least one hour 3 times a week, and have no more than 1 serving of alcohol per day. Attainable: I will shop and prepare lots of vegetables and meat. I will reevaluate my schedule and plan when I visit the gym. On those days, I WILL go to the gym, not decide that day if I want to go or not (because I will usually want to go home or otherwise opt out; I will make saying, “no” NOT an option. During my 3 gym visits, I will 1) swim, 2) do a yoga class, and 3) lift weights. Realistic: This is a realistic goal. Losing 10 pounds in 1 week is not. I can achieve my goal by doing the things listed above. Timely: I will lose 10 pounds (4.5 kilos) by March 1st. Life changes do not just happen; you have to make them happen. Think about what you really want this year and put systems in place that will allow...

001: Getting Beyond The Zombie Life Aug13

001: Getting Beyond The Zombie Life...

http://media.blubrry.com/gcoyl/p/media.medeor.co/gcoyl/GCOYL-001.mp3Podcast: Play in new window | Download (Duration: 14:13 — 13.0MB)In this premier episode, we bring a conversation between Dr. Deb and lifecoach Jeannette Slater. We all get stuck and start living life on auto-pilot. In a sense, we start acting like zombie. This dialogue is a call to wake up from the zombie life, try new things, and breathe new life into your...