046: Muslims where you live Aug01

046: Muslims where you live...

https://media.blubrry.com/gcoyl/p/medeor.co/wp-content/uploads/2016/08/46-Muslims-with-Ibrahim.mp3Podcast: Play in new window | Download (Duration: 38:20 — 35.1MB)Subscribe: iTunes | Android | RSSIn this episode, Dr. Deb has a candid conversation about Muslims with Egyptian, Ibrahim. Are they all terrorists? How can we inform our perspective and deal with our fears about Middle Eastern immigrants? What is Islam really like? What is a typical Muslim like? How might we be more welcoming and more Christ-like in how we treat our Muslim immigrant...

042: Mauricio in Cuba May29

042: Mauricio in Cuba...

http://media.blubrry.com/gcoyl/p/media.medeor.co/gcoyl/42-Mauricio_in_Cuba.mp3Podcast: Play in new window | Download (Duration: 35:49 — 12.3MB)Subscribe: iTunes | Android | RSSDuring a recent trip to Cuba, I recorded this interview with Mauricio, a young man who wants to be a positive influence in the future of his nation. As a graphic designer, Mauricio and other volunteers produce a small magazine for young people. He also helps develop young people in other ways by introducing them to critical thinking and resources that help them connect to ideas and healthy ways of living. Be inspired by Mauricio’s life and hear some fascinating inside knowledge of life inside Cuba during this historic time. Thank you for your patience as the audio quality on this one is not up to our standards. Like everyone who lives in Cuba, we had to be creative and make due with what we...

Legacy

What will you leave behind? That was the focus of a discussion led by my good friend Jack Woloshun. We were there to talk about the many crossroads in life and the people with whom we share the journey. Have you thought about what you would like to leave behind? What will remain once your flesh and bones no longer walk this earth? How will you be remembered? To demonstrate what’s possible, Jack pulled out a book his daughter assembled for his 60th birthday. She had contacted the many family and friends from Jack’s life and invited them to express their sentiments. The words were anything but shallow, very unlike canned drugstore greeting cards. Rather they were lengthy letters of affection, memories and hope for the future. Jack only read 3 or 4 letters from the book, but what he shared demonstrated what it means to leave a legacy. Jack has spent his life giving to others; he has chosen to be a giver instead of a taker. The letters reflect a lifetime of memories, influence and impact. I think that is what it’s all about. Legacy is something you may or may not have thought of; I think the answer is likely dependent on your age and to what extent you consider your life in the grand scheme of humankind. Legacy is not about leaving a hospital or street with your name stamped on. It’s not about things you did that elevated your ego. It’s not about how many toys you collected. It’s not even about how much money you left to charities or your kids. Legacy is fundamentally about who you are. Your legacy is a replica of how you live your life every day. What would happen if people were asked...

Make a Difference

Do you long to make a difference but find it harder than it seems? Here’s a lovely guest article by Amy Roemer that may convince you it’s easier than you think: On a recent cross-country trip, my family stopped in the tiny village of Folsom in northern New Mexico. The ranching community only has 55 inhabitants and almost no businesses, a shadow of what it used to be. Once it had the largest stockyards north of Fort Worth, Texas, but the town never recovered after a devastating catastrophe. It’s such a small place that when we arrived, we had to call a number to get the museum unlocked. The docent came and was so proud of the museum’s legacy that she eagerly shared local stories. We expected the museum to be about the primitive Folsom people, one of the earliest people groups in North America, but we were in for a surprise! We saw many antiques—from milk jugs and saddles to a dynamite detonator—from the founding and pioneer days in the late 1800s. Many of these were tagged with information—whose house it came from, and which family member had donated it. The sense of community was strong. But what struck us was learning about Sally Rooke—who was the local telephone switchboard operator—and how she made a difference during the Dry Cimarron River flood of 1908. Miss Sally received a call that a massive wall of water was heading down the canyon toward Folsom. She started calling friends and neighbors, warning them to head for higher ground. Eventually, the flood hit and wiped out the town. Sally was washed away from her post at the switchboard; her body was found some 12 miles down river along with livestock and only 16 others. Her phone calls...

Excellence

Last week I went to an awesome concert. It was at one of the top venues in the world, the Red Rocks natural amphitheater in Colorado. The setting was almost perfect. The sun set as we watched distant showers over the Denver skyline. Our skin enjoyed a perfect temperature. And then we got to hear musicians who are the best of the best perform from their hearts. The bands? Eclectic Pink Martini from Portland, jazz pianist and vocalist, Diana Krall and her band, and the Colorado Symphony. Wow. The audience was treated to mind-blowing performances by exceptionally talented musicians. The genres played were diverse: jazz, bossa nova, opera, pop. I was on row 48 clapping to the beat, mouthing some of the lyrics and kept saying wow, wow, wow. Excellence has a way of blowing your mind and leaving your speechless. There is something special about being around people who are doing what they were made to do and have perfected their craft. Would anyone question whether John Lennon and Paul McCartney were meant to write songs, or Steve Jobs was to innovate technologies, or Michelangelo was to paint and sculpt? My 16-year old niece is visiting. She’s a competitive swimmer, so I asked her why she swims. She said being in the pool is not only a stress reliever, but also a place where she can be alone with just her and the water. She competes because it helps her work towards her goal of getting a college scholarship and maybe even going professional. She competes against others, but I think she mostly competes against herself. She is convinced she was made to swim. She’s got three things that are necessary: talent, motivation, and discipline. She’s probably still working on her 10,000 hours,...

021: Innovation Institute Jan24

021: Innovation Institute...

http://media.blubrry.com/gcoyl/p/media.medeor.co/gcoyl/21-_Innovation_Institute_with_Harold_Andresen.mp3Podcast: Play in new window | Download (Duration: 45:55 — 42.0MB)Subscribe: iTunes | Android | RSSCar mechanics and engineers are some of the most creative people I know. Harold Andresen is one of those. After owning his own car repair shop for years, he followed his heart for the physically challenged and started The Innovation Institute. It might as well be called, “Machines That Matter,” because it gives disabled craftsmen the chance to fix and improve their own medical devices, but also to create and modify machines to help others—like modifying golf carts that support wheel chairs so disabled kids can go on joy rides to laugh and feel the wind in their faces. For a few brief moments, they forget their disability. But the story is more than using engineering and problem solving to better the lives of wheelchair friends. It’s a story of forgiveness, dealing with disabilities, giving to others, having fun and feeling useful. Harold’s message to you: “I have the one-liners all over my life, my desk and my phone, my shop, the garage. I think finding what works for you is really important. So if you’re favorite song really keeps you motivated to press in to something significant, then you should spend a lot of time letting that favorite song go through your head. But if it’s just your self talk and words, that’s fine too. And if it’s actually doing, you’ve just got to get out in the garage and make stuff, that’s great. And if it’s go to the park and meet people, that’s just great. We have so few molds in our culture of how to do it right; I think that’s the thing I try to avoid. I would say you’ve got to figure out where you’re niche...

002: Living With Purpose Aug20

002: Living With Purpose...

http://media.blubrry.com/gcoyl/p/media.medeor.co/gcoyl/GCOYL-002.mp3Podcast: Play in new window | Download (Duration: 11:27 — 10.5MB)Subscribe: iTunes | Android | RSSIn episode 002, Dr. Deb interviews John Henry about Living With Purpose. John is the director of student mobilization at University of the Nations. He introduces students to overseas volunteer projects. They both make a difference in peoples’ life and experience personal transformation. John invites you to explore a lifestyle of generosity to make a difference in the lives of people around you. It’s a reminder that you bring things to the world no one else does! Be yourself and give of yourself! This episode was recorded in Hawaii, so you’ll get to hear some of the ambience of the islands! For more information on John’s work,...

Ordinary Superheroes

Let’s face it, the world is looking for heroes. Just think of the movies and TV shows released in the last few years with names like Batman, Spiderman, Captain America, Superman, Iron Man, and The Avengers. These superheroes do extraordinary things that go above and beyond the capabilities of “normal” humans. They are usually a select few who were born that way (like Superman), or they were once ordinary people who, through some accident or another (Spiderman was bitten by a spider), gaining some sort of super power. TV and movies are also full of real-life stories of people doing extraordinary (occasionally even superhuman) things. We honor these people, and rightly so, but what about the rest of us “ordinary” people? Is our only role that of the adulate spectator? Or do we have more in us? I believe each one of us can be that “ordinary superhero” the world yearns for. God has placed seeds of greatness in everyone. These are desires, ideas, things, that when grown to fullness, might just change the world! Some of us have nurtured these things in our hearts since we were little children. Others see a great need and rise to the occasion; they have an epiphany, see what needs to be done and rally others to help. I liken this type of inspiration to the relationship between a parent and his child. It’s a parent’s job to tell their kids what to do. But what a joy when your child takes some initiative and just picks up after themselves on their own… without being told! Even better, when they decide to do it for someone else—like their sibling! KNOCK ME OVER WITH A FEATHER! I think God intends us to be co-creators with Him. It’s a two-way street. If...