047: Gratitude Aug21

047: Gratitude

https://media.blubrry.com/gcoyl/p/medeor.co/wp-content/uploads/2016/08/47-Gratitude-with-Jeannette-.mp3Podcast: Play in new window | Download (Duration: 25:38 — 23.5MB)Jeannette Slater & Dr. Deb discuss a cure to many ills and stresses: gratitude! The episode is full of reminders and perspective that we often lose as we experience everyday life. Jeannette read Living in Gratitude: A Journey That Will Change Your Life by Arrien Angeles, internalized it and added her own reflections and experiences to discuss this important topic.   Check out Angeles books and try using the table above for a self-reflective exercise. Angeles Arrien. (2013). Living in Gratitude: A Journey That Will Change Your Life Angeles Arrien. (2013). Living in Gratitude: Mastering the Art of Giving Thanks Every Day, A Month-by-Month Guide Angeles Arrien. (2006). The Second Half of Life: Opening the Eight Gates of...

Toothpaste

I like to think I’m a fairly responsible person. I’m a firstborn, and we are the responsible folks of the world. (OK, so much for the stereotype.) When I see something that needs to be done, I do it. Or I procrastinate! Do you identify? I recently did a deep clean of my bathroom and found not one, but FOUR tubes of toothpaste with a little product left in each one. I think I’ve maybe had two before, but FOUR! When I’m getting ready to go somewhere or to bed at night, I just want to brush my teeth. I don’t want to mess with little bits of toothpaste (that I perceive to take too much of my energy.) There is little counter space in my bathroom, so getting that last little bit out adds a few annoying seconds to my busy lifestyle. This all sounds rather terrible; surely there are bigger fish in life to fry! And certainly, there are MUCH bigger problems in the world to solve! But we all have little things in our lives that bug us until we take care of them. Maybe it’s the flowers that need to be deadheaded so they can bloom again, or that phone call you’ve been meaning to make, or that closet that desperately needs cleaning out. Research shows that simply writing something down—getting it out of your head—can reduce mental and emotional fatigue. Not only do TO-DO lists help you prioritize and plan, but they also help reduce what you are burdened to carry around in your head. Many self-development gurus, like Seth Godin and Rob Bell talk about the importance of saying “yes” to the things we really want and then committing to STEP 1. Saying yes means you commit to...

Fear or Love?

Every now and then you stumble upon a life-defining truth that is simple yet profound. I found such a concept in Neale Donald Walsch’s book, Conversations with God. I hope you too find it helpful in sorting out your motivations and actions. “Every action taken by human beings is based in love or fear, not simply those dealing with relationships. Decisions affecting business, industry, politics, religion, the education of your young, the social agenda of your nations, the economic goals of your society, choices involving war, peace, attack, defense, aggression, submission; determinations to covet or give away, to save or to share, to unite or to divide—every single free choice you ever undertake arises out of one of the only two possible thoughts there are: a thought of love or a thought of fear. Fear is the energy which contracts, closes down, draws in, runs, hides, hoards, harms. Love is the energy which expands, opens up, sends out, stays, reveals, shares, heals. Fear wraps our bodies in clothing, love allows us to stand naked. Fear clings to and clutches all that we have, love gives all that we have away. Fear holds close, love holds dear. Fear grasps, love lets go. Fear rankles, love soothes. Fear attacks, love amends. Every human thought, word, deed is based in one emotion or the other. You have no choice about this, because there is nothing else from which to choose. But you have free choice about which of these to select.” So I ask along with the great wisdom of the universe. Will you think and act from a place of fear or love? Walsch, N.D. (1995). Conversations with God: an uncommon dialogue. New York:...

Interdependence

“Interdependence is the relationship between two or more living things where each one benefits from the other.” I love that definition.* Introduction by Dr. Deb: In my interpersonal communication class this week, students and I discussed marriage and family relationships. As in all healthy relationships, interdependence should be present. In relationships, we are connected at many levels, some of which science and psychology are just beginning to understand. We mirror each other, synchronize our movements, and communicate in ways we’re not even aware of. (Watch the film, I Am, There is evidence that even plants and animals are affected by human thought and action. How much more other people? With this in mind, read Jeannette’s article, and consider how much you are connected to and affect others by your choices. At the end of the last century, German biochemist and ecology specialist, Frederic Vester, demonstrated six principles of optimum biological life, or “biotic potential.” He defined “biotic potential” as “the maximum capacity of organisms to grow and reproduce under ideal conditions.” These six growth force principles underlie all of our life-giving actions. These can be applied to individuals, as well as faith communities and other groups. I will discuss these in a series of six articles. The first growth force principle is Interdependence. Imagine a person standing on the edge of a pond. In the middle of the pond is a lily pad. The person takes a rock and throws the rock onto the lily pad. The primary effect is that the lily pad is pushed under the water. However there are additional effects as the waves from the splash ripple out across the pond. As individuals and people of influence, we must be aware that our decisions and actions will have an effect...

Choices

Not all choices are equal. There are choices and there are CHOICES! This article concerns the choices behind the choices, or what the business world calls strategic decisions and operational decisions. Many people fail or fall victim to circumstances because they end up making a strategic decision when an operational decision is called for. Teenage pregnancy is a prime example. When we fail to make a good strategic decision, we make bad operational decisions. For example: I don’t feel like going to the gym. That is an operational decision for the moment. However, if I have made a strategic decision to be in good physical shape and/or be at a healthy weight, the current decision is hopefully an exceptional operational decision, not a permanent one. So I will go to the gym tomorrow. The problem is that we often over-rely on operational decisions—how I feel at the moment—to ultimately make our strategic decisions. Then life pushes us around instead of us pushing life. If I make the decision to come home and drink beer and eat chips instead of going to the gym—day after day—I have ultimately made a strategic decision to be a beer-drinking, chip-eating (and likely overweight TV-watcher) instead of a disciplined healthy person. I just listened to an important book, The Power Of Habit: Why We Do What We Do In Life And Business. The book gets into how and why we make choices. Some things we do by remote (habit), like shifting a manual car, turning right when we enter a grocery store, or eating that cookie at 3 every afternoon. We CAN actually form new habits. I cchose (and I choose) to be healthy, so I can’t succumb to the routine mentioned above everyday. By exercising my will power...

Why Getting Control Of It ALL Is So Important Apr11

Why Getting Control Of It ALL Is So Important

“We like to pretend sometimes that we are made up of a system of buckets. We like to think we can live, ‘what happens in Vegas stays in Vegas,’ moments in one area of our lives without affecting other areas. It’s just not true. If you’re ailing in one portion of your life, it tends to infect the other portions. If there’s poison in a glass of water, no one says, ‘be careful, the middle of that water is poisoned.’ The same principle applies to your work.” – Jon Acuff, author of Quitter: Closing the Gap Between Your Day Job and Your Dream...